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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> and terry moran and bill weir are hot on the trail as the candidates in a virtual dead heat crisscross the nation in a final push for those make or break votes. >>> plus -- with a new storm approaching and families up and down the east coast still without homes, "nightline" joins our abc family for a day of giving. and gives you a chance to make a difference. >> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran in des moines, iowa. bill weir in manchester, new hampshire. and cynthia mcfadden in new york city. this is "nightline," november 5th, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm cynthia mcfadden. tonight, the sprint to the finish line with only 24 hours left in this presidential race, my co-anchors terry moran and bill weir on the trail with the candidates. we'll have their reports in a moment. >>> but first, the other story dominating the news for the past week, hurricane sandy and the devastation left in its wake. and the desire to do something to help. so all day today, disney and abc have been raising money to help those who need it most. we kicked it off this morning with a telethon
and cynthia mcfadden in new york city, and terry moran in tom's river, new jersey, this is a special edition of "nightline," the perfect storm. october 31st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran and i'm in tom's river, new jersey, one of the hard-hit communities on the water in this state. the water that superstorm andy hurled against the atlantic seaboard from maryland, all the way up to new york city and beyond. so many communities utterly devastated. you can see this kind of scene, as you see behind me, mile after mile on this coast. and two days after landfall now, the problems are piling up. the death toll now at 74. there's reports of an oil spill and now, a dangerous new threat in many communities, the ruptured gas lines in town after town. you can hear the hissing, you can smell the dangerous gas in the air. and the threat of explosions and fires is growing by the minute. morning broke on the jersey shore and the sun came out for the first time since the storm. and in the sunlight, all the wreckage seemed sadder, some how. it's not a dream, not even a nightmare. it's just here. >>
evening, i'm terry moran. and tonight, we bring you a fresh crisis in a community already decimated by superstorm sandy. tensions are running high over a dwindling supply of vital fuel and supplies on staten island. perhaps the least well known of new york city's five borrows. just a short ferry ride from manhattan, smack dab in the middle of new york harbor. so, that means it bore the brunt of the devastating flood surge. so, tonight, as search andless kupt continues, my co-anchor cynthia mcfadden is there. good evening, cynthia. >> reporter: good evening, terry. massive disaster are composed of small tragedies, one that played out behind me. you may just be able to make out a staircase that used to lead to a house where mother, father and 13-year-old daughter lived. only the mother survived. those stories are far too common out here in staten island. >> when is the government coming? >> reporter: it was a desperate cry for help. >> we're going to die, if we get killed with the weather, we're going to die! >> reporter: in staten island, donna pleaded with her senators for more food
of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 7th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm bill weir. well, as the happy obama family flew back to washington today, a few conservative pundits observed that if only america had the same demographics as it did under ronald reagan, mitt romney would have won. yes. and if jonie loves chachi was still in primetime, people wouldn't laugh at my parachute pants. the country is changing in waves. and what last night taught us is that the party that knows how to ride those waves wins. here's my co-anchor, terry moran. >> reporter: america awakened to a new political reality this morning. >> what happened? >> i was wrong. >> reporter: so were a lot of republicans. >> i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader. >> thank you so much. >> reporter: what happened yesterday's simple, really, and profound and reflected in all those faces in the crowds last night at obama and romney headquarters. the american e
. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city. this is "nightline," november 13th, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm terry moran. well the twists just keep on coming in the scandal that led cia director david petraeus to step down. and today there was a stunning new turn that now the top general in afghanistan is feeling the unwelcome glare of the spotlight. at the center of it all, a tampa socialite named jill kelly. and abc's brian ross has set out to discover who this woman really is who's helped unravel the careers of one of the most powerful men in america. >> reporter: her detractors are harsh saying 37-year-old jill kelly of tampa is nothing more than a name-dropping, social-climbing, bored socialite. in the course of only a few days two of the most powerful men in america have been surrounded by scandal because of action she has taken. sending shock waves all the way to the white house. >> well, i certainly think wouldn't call it welcome. >> reporter: first it was cia director david petraeus. and now it is general joh
resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city. this is "nightline," november 20th, 2012. >>> good evening. i'm terry moran. thanksgiving's only two days away now, which means that holiday shopping frenzy is upon us. and if your christmas list is threatening to do major damage to your bank account, you're not alone. when it comes to finding the very best deals on everything from smartphones to cameras to toys, the answer may be only an app away. abc's sharyn alfonsi brings us the new tricks to saving big for our series, "easy money." >> reporter: meet the perillo family. three sisters in constant motion. it doesn't leave a lot of time for working parents, like sarah and chris perillo, to do a lot of holiday shopping. >> we look for online free shipping. anything we can do to avoid the malls and bring three kids to the malls. >> reporter: increasingly, families like the perillos who struggle to find time to shop and the best deals are turning to the internet. this year, for the first time, more than half of us will shop online, spe
, his career and what's next. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 29th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. well, tonight, an important investigation raising controversial questions about how far is too far when it comes to physical discipline and control in schools? for most kids, the worst they've got to fear from unruly behavior in class is a trip to the principal's office. but in some schools, students are receiving far more severe treatment, like being locked in windowless cells or stuffed into bags. now, some of the footage you're about to see is not easy to watch. here's abc's brian ross with a "nightline" investigates. >> reporter: this surveillance video shows a high school student by the name on andre mccollins, in the lower right of the screen, about to go through what his school calls skin shock therapy for misbehavior. about 60 volts of therapy. there are no national standards for the punishments or restraints used on school children, including those lik
. what if your children had never seen or owned a single book of their own? here's abc's terry moran with a group of people who are changing that for millions of children, one little smile at a time. >> reporter: you remember your first book. a moment filled with bright dreams and possibilities. and today, in washington, d.c. these children began living those dreams. >> look. >> reporter: oh, a little tiny baby bird. i didn't even see that. kaliyah is one of millions of american girls and boys, 42% of all of our children who live in poverty. books are luxuries in many of their homes. >> we are here to celebrate 100 million books. >> reporter: 20 years ago, kyle zimmer founded first book, which brings books to children in need. 100 million books now and counting. >> i've seen the light in their eyes go on. they can't believe they get to keep books of their own. >> reporter: it makes a life long difference. studies show a child's ability to understand stories jumps by 20% when there are books in the home. >> read both of those. >> reporter: way back in 1992, crystal stewart got a book
of wisconsin. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, bill weir and tonight, juju chang in new york city, this is fwhl until, november 2nd, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm juju chang. in the five days since superstorm sandy ravaged the east coast, those caught in its path are still reeling from the magnitude of the crisis. we now know the storm took the lives of at least 105 people, and caused an estimated $50 billion in damage and knocked out power to 8.5 million initially and 3.6 million people still remain in the dark tonight. and late today, in new york city, the largest marathon in the world was canceled for the first time ever in its 42-year history, following days of outrage at the specter of precious resources being deployed away from relief efforts. not far from the starting blocks for the marathon, staten island is a wasteland of destruction. >> within seconds, my street was getting flooded with water. >> reporter: jennifer has been staying at this hilton garden inn since the storm forced her to evacuate. >> they didn't have jackets, th
on a path to face a new reality. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 8th, 2012. >> good evening, i'll bill weir. well, today in arizona, a 77-year-old man took his first free breath in 38 years. of course, people leave prison every day in this country, but what makes this moment extraordinary are the twists and turns that preceded it. the double homicide, the exwife's accusations, the desperate decades spent trying to prove innocence. abc's dan harris has been following this story for years, and brings us the very latest in this "nightline" investigates. >> reporter: you are looking at bill macumber's first breaths of freedom, after serving 38 years for a double murder he says he did not commit. >> big day, family day. >> reporter: this scene, the culmination of an astonishingly nasty fight between macumber and two powerful women. his ex-wife and also the governor of arizona. late today, at his first news conference, macumber cried when talking about the lawyers who fought
lion. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 9th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm bill weir. when president obama strode into the east room of the white house this afternoon, we all knew that job one of term two is to hammer out some sort of deal with republicans to keep the federal government from veering off the so-called fiscal cliff. and we knew he would probably lay down some markers. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. i'm not going to do that. >> but what we did not know about that moment is that the president was also thinking about finding a new director of the cia. after decorated four-star general david petraeus admitted an affair and resigned. abc's senior foreign affairs c
the planet's most mysterious predators. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 15th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm cynthia mcfadden. tonight, we go on the air, intensifying missile attacks are pounding the gaza strip. part of an escalating conflict that has the world holding its breath, fearing a new war in the middle east could erupt at any moment. tensions between the israelis and palestinians are threatening to boil over, in a region still destabilized from the arab spring. abc's christiane amanpour reports from a middle east on the brink. christiane? >> reporter: cynthia, tonight, i can tell, you jerusalem where i am is extremely tense. here and around the world, everyone is watching to see who will make the next move in this increasingly deadly game of chess in the holy land. the last time there was this kind of violence was four years ago when israel conducted an air and ground invasion of gaza, it lasted three weeks and left more than 1,000 people dead. after days of tit for tat
resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 16th, 2012. >> good friday evening, i'm bill weir. well, only in america is it controversial for me to begin tonight's program by declaring that global warming is really happening. for doubters, 332-straight months of above average temperatures is not proof enough. and even among believers, there's a fight over who to blame, god or man, natural cycles of fossil fuels. the very words climate change were noticeably absent from this past election, but sandy brought them back in a big way and eager to fuel the conversation, two artists convinced they can help skeptics see climate change in ways scientists cannot. if you drive outside of juneau, alaska, past nugget falls and through the blueberry colored icebe icebergs, you will find mendenhall glacier. of what's left of it. >> the ice came out to right about here in 2007. >> reporter: wow. five years ago, we'd be bumping into the glacier right here. >> yeah. >> reporter: and if you time your visit just right, you might run into
and mccain and the president. abc's terry moran called it an obama smackdown. "the washington post" john mccain's benghazi, and some say it's about mccain being bitter about losing to obama four years ago. >> i think five names and a conflagration, and number one petraeus and broadwell and number two, benghazi, benghazi, petraeus, broadwell, military ethics, mccain obama reduction, and fifth, the susan rice story, which life imitates art. if you go back and watch the movie advise and content shall the novel then turned movie, it was a south carolina senator opposing the president's nomination as secretary of state that is the whole dynamic of the movie and i'm it willing you, find it on youtube or net flicks because it really parallels, echo out. >> and if it's a media we'll turn it into a media review. the media had an opportunity to ask hard questions and didn't get any at the news conference, why not. >> the format is not controlled to follow-up. he picks the people he's going to call on. people can't respond and say, wait a minute, mr. president, we want a follow-up on this. this is
will need the umbrella tomorrow. and then later on "nightline". >> i'm terry moran. coming up next on "nightline" from kipper apps to seasonal traps. our insiders crack the codes to getting the best deals on gifts this holiday season. and after 15 years, 98 cities and a record breaking run, we will bring you behind the sceness of the making of the lion king. [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light, buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents. let the making begin just unroll it, fill, top, bake, and present. that must have taken you forever! it was really tough. [ female announcer ] pillsbury pie crust. let the making begin news at the top of the broadcast. the search for a man who fell into a quarry full of water in oakland. now to john alston live at the scene. john? >> dan, we have new information since our last live report. some divers from the alameda dive team have approached the water. you can see them getting ready o
. >>> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is a special edition of "nightline," "giving thanks: darius' dream tour." >> good evening and happy thanksgiving, i'm cynthia mcfadden. on this day dedicated to giving thanks, we want to introduce you to a young man whose story is a testament to the power of friendship and the strength of the spirit. his name is darius weems and his life has been an incredible and some might say nearly impossible journey. he lives each day with a devastating disease, duchenne muscular dystrophy, yet he's one of the most positive and inspiring people we've ever met. we're heading off on an unexpected adventure. it's hard to believe all of this started as a road trip between friends. >> it's hay hem. kind of like beatle mania. >> reporter: darius goes beatle. but seven years and many, many miles later, it's turned into this. a lesson about life from a guy who knows first hand how precious every day is. and in rural south china, maine, they are very happy he is here. it isn't the fab four brin
. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 23rd, 2012. >> good evening, i'm bill weir. hope you had a thankful thanksgiving. if you braved the mall today, i hope it was worth it. tens of millions stormed the stores for black friday, named in part for the kind of robust business that pushes retailers well into the black and one of the biggest sellers today, the latest version of the video game halo. which sold almost 4 million units in just the first week on shelves. halo just one reason why video games are quickly eclipsing hollywood block busters for pure profit. and abc's neal karlinsky explains why. >> action! >> big cameras, big special effects. and a music score by a full orchestra in england. world class artists and a crew of hundreds, and what you get is the lead contender for this year's biggest entertainment block buster. not a movie, a video game. halo 4, the latest in what's become a $3 billion franchise, all based around a game played on microsoft's xbox. even more surprisin
: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 28th, 2012. >> good evening, all, i am bill weir. so, what does it take for the most advanced civilization in human history to become utterly transfixed by six ping-pong balls? well, only about half a billion dollars, before taxes. yes, the powerball prize was a record setter. as the jackpot swelled, the ticket-buying frenzy topped a rate of 130,000 a minute. after an astounding 16 rollovers, the $580 million question tonight was, would anyone actually win this time? on the dreamer beat, once again tonight, here's abc's ryan owens. >> reporter: this had been a record-breaking jackpot night. >> america's favorite game coming to you right now -- >> reporter: after all of the hype, the days of breathless anticipation, it comes down to this. >> $580 million jackpot for you. >> reporter: in a television studio in tallahassee, florida, machines spit out six numbers. numbers that are oh so close, but not quite the ones printed on your ticket. tonight it tu
to help those in need. >> first here's terry moran with pictures on what's coming up after abc news at 11:00. >> another turn in a widening scandal. the tampa socialite that helped bring down the head of the cia. >> a murder in paradise, and the web site tighten what's on the run from the law. construction on the west side of 695, traffic is moving on the first half of the interchange bring. and roadwork at fredrick road. both projects won't be complete until later this summer. for more go to abc2news.com and i'll track the delays tomorrow on good morning maryland beginning at 4:30. [ dollar ] that's me. l50858544p. but i'm not just a number. i have a purpose. a higher purpose. [ muffled ] have some respect! not good. oh, man. hello? mm, no! finally -- the buck stops here. [ male announcer ] mcdonald's new hot'n spicy mcchicken. tender, juicy chicken with a crispy, spicy coating. at only a dollar, it's spicy, not pricey. but only for a limited time. . >> off the field and into film. terrell suggs is doing between plays. tonight he was in his first feature film in the big screen "the coali
and in one town natural gas leaks are the concern. abc nightline anchor terry moran has the story. >> fires rage in the town on the jersey shore early this morning fueled by natural gas. a harbinger of a worst case scenario. a potential disaster after the disaster. >> you can hear the gas and smell the gas. everything you go you hear just all of the open gas lines going. just scared to death. >> reporter: do youer that? that is the sound that everyone left in the towns is fearing the most right now. a hissing gas main. you hear it on street after street right up the shore. you can smell the gas in the air and fire officials are concerned that the the towns are basically ticking time bombs. everywhere we went along the jersey shore today in town after town the air was filled with this hissing menace. >> if the wind shifts it will get into the crawl space. god fored by a spark. >> in the town of ortley beach frank is worried and getting angry. >> reporter: are have you called the gas company? >> five times. >> reporter: what has the response been? >> we will get there as soon as we can. >> re
for the white house, tonight, barack obama has defeated mitt romney. and victory and defeat. terry moran is live from the winner's circle at obama headquarters in chicago. and bill weir from the romney campaign in boston. to bring us to the heart of the action this historic evening. >>> plus, the contentious race in the rearview mirror the nation speaks. whatter use matter most to voters tonight and what's next for the president and the country? >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news with terry moran in chicago, illinois, bill we if ren boston, massachusetts, and cynthia mcfadden in new york city this is a special edition of "nightline," election, "your voice, your vote." >>> good evening, i'm cynthia mcfadden. tonight another four years for president barack obama. as a night of hard-won battleground state wins propelled him to victory over mitt romney. all the votes have not yet ben counted. as of right now the president has 303 electoral votes. well over the 270 votes required to win. mitt romney has 206. as for the popular vote, a thinner margin. barack obama with just over 55 mi
are the source of a major potentially explosive problem. abc's terry moran reports. >> reporter: fires rage in the town in the jersey shore. fueled by natural gas. it is a harbinger of a worst case sa thein scenario, disaste the disaster. >> you can hear the gas you. can smell the gas. everywhere you go you hear -- shhh, just the gas, open gas lines going. just scared to death. >> reporter: do you hear that? that is the sound that everyone left in the towns is fearing the most now. a hifsing gas main. you hear it on street after street. right up the shore. you can smell the gas in the air. and fire officials are concern that these towns are basically ticking time bombs. everywhere we went, along the jersey shore, in town after town. the air was filled with this hissing menace. >> as the wind shifts it is going to get into the crawlspace. god forbid a spark. >> reporter: frank is worried and getting angry. have you called the gas company about this? >> five files. >> reporter: what has the response been? >> we'll get there as soon as we can. >> reporter: high pressured gas main broke right n
. yesterday it reached a milestone. bringing smiles to 100 million boys and girls. abc's terry moran has the story. >> reporter: you remember, your first book. a moment filled with bright dreams and possibilities. and in washington, d.c. these children began living those dreams. >> little tiny baby bird. i didn't see that. >> reporter: kalia is one of millions of american girls and boys, books are luxuries in many of their homes. >> we are here to celebrate the 100 millionth book. >> reporter: she founded first books bringing books to children in need, 100 million books now and counting. >> i have seen the light in their eyes go on. they can't belief they got to keep books of their own. >> reporter: it makes a lifelong difference. studies show a child's ability to understand stories jumps 20% when there are books in the home. way back in 1992, crystal stewart got a book from first books. she was the oldest of four kids of a working mom. and sheep just loved to read. still does. it almost sound like reading helped you get away from the tough parts of your childhood? >> it did. >> reporter
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)